Oliemolens.nl - De Zoeker - Zaandam

De Zoeker – English

De Zoeker

De Zoeker oil mill was built in 1673. In 1925 the mill, standing in the open field near Zaandijk, was hit by a tornado. Thus, yet another mill was in danger of disappearing. In an attempt to save the mill, mill enthusiast Frans Mars called on Zaankanters to join together. Two weeks later, the De Zaansche Molen association was a fact and the mill was saved.

Oliemolens.nl - De Zoeker - Zaandam

From oil to cocoa waste

The Seeker has had various functions. Of course, as an oil mill for a very long time. After 1891, Dezoeker was converted into a paint mill. In 1912 the mill was also used for grinding shells and processing cocoa waste. This did not last long because in 1914 oil was struck again with the inner workings of the Wheel of Adventure. Until a tornado paralyzed the mill in 1925.

Oliemolens.nl - De Zoeker - Zaandam

World news

In 1968 the mill had to make way for a new residential area. A spectacular move to the Kalverringdijk on the Zaanse Schans followed. The move became world news, because the mill body was lifted in its entirety over the track. An Urban Legend has it that the two millwrights Nico Maas and Gerrit Smit had been inside the body and watched from behind a window!

Oliemolens.nl - De Zoeker - Zaandam

Peanut oil

Peanut oil is now minted almost every day at tDe Zoeker mill. This peanut oil, or arachis oil, is processed into consumer oil. This clear peanut oil has a high boiling point and is therefore ideal for stir-frying, baking and frying. Perfect for sauces, mayonnaise and dressings. Of course for sale at De Zaansche Molen.

Oliemolens.nl - De Zoeker - Zaandam

Informatie

Address
Kalverringdijk 31
1509BT Zaandam
The Netherlands

Website
De Zaansche Molen – De Zoeker

Oliemolens.nl - Het Pink - Koog aan de Zaan

Het Pink – English

Oliemolens.nl - Het Pink - Koog aan de Zaan

Het Pink

The oldest parts of the Het Pink oil mill in Koog aan de Zaan probably date from 1620. The original rocking mill was replaced in 1751 by an octagonal mill, which was placed on the original bottom square. Until 1931, Het Pink operated on wind power. After the death of owner Adriaan Honig in the same year, the mill stood still and fell into disrepair.

Oliemolens.nl - Het Pink - Koog aan de Zaan

In 1939 the mill was donated to De Zaansche Molen. The Gebroeders Husslage mill factory immediately started the restoration, the first major mill restoration in the Zaan region. After the official opening in September 1939, the mill was converted into a museum mill.

The mill would be opened for the first time on May 10, 1940. Especially for the opening, Frans Mars (founder of the association) had exhibited some of his work in the mill, and it was also decided to put the Pink in the traditional bridal dress for this occasion. The mill was decorated on May 8 and 9. The outbreak of the Second World War threw a spanner in the works and on May 10, the beautifully decorated mill was hastily stripped of its decoration.

Oliemolens.nl - Het Pink - Koog aan de Zaan

Planting seeds for future millers

Het Pink has an extensive history for the association. In addition to oil minting and receiving visitors, millers are also trained and there is a carpentry club for youth members. Here a seed is planted for future millperch (m/f). Youth education projects have also taken place in this special mill for many years. Like Kind in 1945, who asked the millwrights if they came to work in their wooden shoes.

Oliemolens.nl - Het Pink - Koog aan de Zaan

Informatie

Address
Pinkstraat 12
1541HD Koog aan de Zaan
The Netherlands

Website
De Zaansche Molen – Het Pink

Oliemolens.nl-Holten's Molen-Deurne

Holten’s Molen – English

Holten’s Molen

Holten’s Molen in Deurne is a mill with three functions that was and is still used as a small-scale village business. Milling is done for bakers, families and mill shops, and oil is minted for painters of wood and metal. And trees are sawn in the sawmill to be processed into benches and tables. The mill used to belong to the Holten family and since 1993 it has belonged to a foundation with about 25 volunteers.

Oil mill history

A few years after the construction of the mill in 1890, Louis Holten, builder-owner, took over the furnishings of the oil mill from the estate of a water mill in Horst. This was placed at the bottom of the mill. After a short interruption, the oil work was in use until 1940. The drive was then also provided by a Deutch engine. After 1945 the oil work was demolished. An edge stone  was placed against the belt. In the early 1950s, milling also stopped and the sawmill continued. The mill fell into disrepair and the municipality even applied for a demolition permit in 1989.

Oliemolens.nl-Holten's Molen-Deurne

Restorations

A number of mill enthusiasts then bought the mill from the municipality in 1993 to renovate it and turn it into a working mill in the state of 1900. When it reopened in 1998, grinding and oil extraction brought the mill back to life. . Some parts of the old oil mill have been reused. The tracks in the mill and the remains of the old oil mill were the basis for the reconstruction. The beating bench and edge stones came from the Wanroy horse mill and were indispensable. It is a simple farmer’s percussion.

Oliemolens.nl-Holten's Molen-Deurne

Volunteers

The employees of the various activities of Holten’s Molen are all volunteers: board members, the milling team, the oil butchers, shop ladies, the sawyers and the volunteers for educational purposes. Almost everyone can help with other activities. This allows e.g. excursions for young and old with varying guides and millers are carried out. The explanation and demonstration of oil striking is an important part of this. This way the stories about the old technology come back to life. The production of linseed oil is carried out on a few days during the week. This can be done with an auxiliary motor or with the wind.

Oliemolens.nl-Holten's Molen-Deurne

Informatie

Address
Veldstraat  39
5751AA Deurne
The Netherlands

Website
Holtens Molen

Oliemolens.nl - De Wachter - Zuidlaren - Logo

De Wachter – English

De Wachter (guardian)

De Wachter corn and oil mill in Zuidlaren was built in 1851 by the Van Bon family from Midlaren. The flour mill, an octagonal mill, is a combined flour and oil mill. This means that not only was grain milled there, but there was also an oil mill. Both were powered by wind power.

In 1895 the mill was purchased by the Medendorp family from Zuidlaren. Medendorp was progressive and modernized. The mill was expanded in 1898 with a spice mill. Because bread had to be on the table even in windless weather, two steam engines were built that same year. One generated electricity for the oil mill, the other powered the spice mill via transmission belts. From 1906 the oil wringers were also driven with this.

De Wachter thus received the first steam-driven energy supply. Very special at that time, because the village of Zuidlaren did not receive electricity until 1921. In 1923, the mill switched to electricity from the public grid in Zuidlaren and the steam engines were decommissioned. The mill remained dependent on the wind for grinding grain.

Oliemolens.nl - De Wachter - Zuidlaren

Decline of mills

In the 1930s, many Dutch mills had to stop competing with the industry and fell into disrepair. Of the approximately ten thousand mills in the Netherlands, there are still about a thousand left today, of which only five hundred are capable of grinding. This is how “De Wachter” also fell into disrepair. In the 1920s, the oil mill and the spice mill were closed and many parts of the mill were demolished, including the steam engines. In 1950, miller Medendorp also decided to shut down the flour mill. The end for “The Wachter” then seems near.

Oliemolens.nl - De Wachter - Zuidlaren

Restoration, a long-term matter

Jan Medendorp’s grandson, J.D. (Diek) Medendorp, transferred the mill to the Koren- en Oliemolen “De Wachter” Foundation in 1989. This foundation has further restored the mill and brought back the original steam drive. An initial expansion with a bakery and bakery shop has made it possible to make the entire process “From wheat to bread” visible. Several (working) steam engines were subsequently installed. A number of village professions and crafts (blacksmith, clog maker, adjuster, shoemaker, farmer) have now been brought together in a second extension. There is also a large collection of utensils (farm, tools, household) on display. This means that De Wachter is now much more than a mill. Museum de Wachter has grown into a true experience park for young and old.

Oliemolens.nl - De Wachter - Zuidlaren

The oil mill in operation

A large group of volunteers works in and out of season to preserve the cultural history and craftsmanship of “De Wachter” and make it accessible to current and future generations.

Informatie

Address
Bolwerk 11
9471AT Zuidlaren
The Netherlands

Website
De Wachter

Oliemolens.nl - Oostendorper watermolen - Haaksbergen - Logo

Oostendorper water mill – English

Oostendorper watermolen

Oliemolens.nl - Oostendorper watermolen - Haaksbergen

The current Oostendorper watermill has not always been in its current location. This mill was originally located between the Lankheterbrug and the Veddersbrug. This mill must have been built around 1400, after the Buurserbeek and the Vedde were connected through Deventer. Remnants of this mill were found during work there on the Buurserbeek in the 1920s and 1930s in the form of heavy oak beams.

Oostendorp

A report dated February 17, 1545 from the imperial commissioner Jan van Oostendorp regarding the domain goods in the Haaksbergen office states that the mill was in a very dilapidated state. That is why a new mill was built on the grounds of Oostendorp, the current location. On September 18, 1548, the first grain could be milled again. The oil mill could not yet be put into operation at that time, because the millstones were still missing; These may have been lost during transport from Deventer to Haaksbergen.

Over the years, the mills have fallen into disrepair and been rebuilt several times. In 1946, the oil mill was even completely washed away during heavy weather. Afterwards, architect Jan Jans rebuilt the mill in a romantic style. However, the doors were locked and decay soon set in.

Oliemolens.nl - Oostendorper watermolen - Haaksbergen
Oliemolens.nl - Oostendorper watermolen - Haaksbergen

The last restauration

In the eighties, the (tourist) importance of the double mill was rediscovered and the mill was returned to its original state. On January 2, 1988, the mayor of Haaksbergen, Drs. J.D. Gabor, the last stone laid in connection with the restoration carried out.

The volunteers

Since that time, the mills have been run by a large number of enthusiastic volunteers who press oil and grind corn and sell their own products in a small shop.

Oliemolens.nl - Oostendorper watermolen - Haaksbergen

Informatie

Address
Watermolenweg 3
7481VL Haaksbergen
The Netherlands

Website
Oostendorper Watermolen

Oliemolens.nl - Logo - Commissie Olieslaan

Commission and Contact – English

Commission

The Olieslaan Commission has taken the initiative to add the oil-pressing craft to the Intangible Heritage of the Netherlands inventory. The Olieslaan Committee consists of the Woldzigt oil and flour mill, the Eerbeekse Oliemolen and Noordmolen Twickel. This initiative has been developed into a complete description of the oil-mining craft and added to the inventory.

After the credit has been added, you cannot sit back and then remain in the inventory forever. Part of the description is an assurance plan with improvement and action points to continue to preserve the craft for the future. The progress and implementation of this is monitored by Intangible Heritage Netherlands.

The implementation and progress of the assurance actions is coordinated by the Olieslaan Commission.

To date, Oliemolens.nl has been based on voluntary cooperation between those involved and is not organized on the basis of a foundation. If there is a need for this or if this becomes necessary, this will still be done.

Guarantee actions

  • In consultation with Vereniging De Hollandsche Molen to jointly draw up a PR plan for the craft.
  • In consultation with Vereniging De Hollandsche Molen to jointly develop a teaching package for wind and water mills in which the craft of oil pressing is explained to children.
  • Bundle and store important documents and archives in one central archive and/or digitize them and make them accessible.
  • Breathe new life into the Guild of Oil Butchers by registering it with the Chamber of Commerce Developing a website for the Oil Butchers Guild.
  • Together with the owners of mills, investigate whether the mills can be made (more) accessible to people with a physical disability.
  • Prepare an audio guide for non-native speakers (not English and German).
  • To maintain a healthy financial position, look for other sources of income: entrance tickets, sales of souvenirs, offering refreshments, renting out wedding locations, meeting packages, etc.
Oliemolens.nl - Logo - Commissie Olieslaan

Our corporate identity

The basis of our corporate identity is established with the logo above. The color of the letters of the word represents the color of linseed oil. The font was developed based on medieval manuscripts. The striking bench is made of brown wood. The blue of the flax flower was used as a supporting color.

Contact

For contact and information about the oil mills, you can contact the mills listed on the website of the oil mill in question.

To contact the Olieslaan Commission, you can complete the contact form below.

Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.

UNESCO – English

Miller’s craft on UNESCO’s intangible heritage list

On December 5, 2017, there was a party for the Dutch millers. The ancient craft of milling has been recognized by UNESCO as Cultural Intangible Heritage. A recognition for an old craft with a bright future.

“Intangible heritage is ‘living heritage’. It includes social customs, performances, rituals, traditions, expressions, special knowledge or skills that communities and groups (and sometimes even individuals) recognize as a form of cultural heritage. A special feature is that it is transmitted from generation to generation and is important for a common identity.”

Oliemolens.nl - UNESCO

Intangible Heritage

On December 6, 2023, the Olieslaan craft was registered in the Intangible Heritage of the Netherlands inventory. The millers and oil butchers are responsible for transferring the heritage. Volunteer millers play an important role in this, which means that the craft of oil milling has been classified as an intangible heritage. The craft of oil-mining is that intangible heritage.

Olieslaan - Immaterieel Erfgoed Nederland

A piece of history

About 5,000 years ago, humans switched from hunting/gathering to agriculture. The grain was (usually) ground by hardworking women, for example by this Egyptian woman with a grinding stone.

Oliemolens.nl - Egypte - UNESCO

Limestone statuette from a tomb in Egypt of the 5th Dynasty of the Old Kingdom, 2465-2323 BC.

Around 6,000 BC, grain grains were rubbed finely between two stones. One stone was hollowed out, another stone was placed on top and the grains were crushed into powder. Derived from this is the hand mill that originated at the beginning of our era. The hand mill (queerne) or rotating mill consisted of two stones, round in shape. Here the grain was crushed between a fixed (lower stone) and a rotating (upper) millstone of approximately 30 cm in diameter. These stones are also called the girder and the bishop. The Roman invention of this dates back to the 1st century BC.

The development of wind and water mills already gave rise to a new profession in Roman times: that of mulder or miller. Mills powered by slaves or animals. When a horse or donkey was used, we started to speak of horse mills. The water mill came into operation in the Roman Empire and the work immediately became much easier.

The Romans contributed to the spread of the Roman Empire, which had its northern border, the Limes, up to the Rhine. It took several years before the water grain mills managed to gain a place next to the mills operated by slaves or animals. The slower spread of water wheel mills must be largely attributed to the fact that hand mills and horse mills could be placed anywhere, while – as far as water mills were concerned – they were always dependent on the presence of running water. In England, fragments of undershot wheels and complete millstones from three water mills from the 3rd century, possibly from the end of the 2nd century, have been discovered near Hadrian’s rampart, built by the Romans.

Water- wind- and horse mills

The development of wind and water mills already gave rise to a new profession in Roman times: that of mulder or miller. Mills powered by slaves or animals. When a horse or donkey was used, we started to speak of horse mills. The water mill came into operation in Rome and the work immediately became a lot easier.

Oliemolens.nl - Water - Wind en Rosmolens - UNESCO

The Greek geographer Strabo (64 BC – 20 AD) first mentions a water mill for grinding grain, which Roman soldiers are said to have seen in the palace of King Mithridates of Pontus (Anatolia, now Turkey). Roman engineers improved the scoop board, the cogwheel and the wheel that had to transmit the power to the axle of the millstone and thus the performance.

Oliemolens.nl - Watermolencomplex Barbegal - UNESCO - Schets
Oliemolens.nl - Watermolencomplex Barbegal - UNESCO - tekening

Barbegal water mill complex

The Roman Empire needed a lot of grain to supply food for legionaries and cities such as Rome and Arlas. Near Arlas in France, archaeologists recently found the Roman ‘industrial’ water mill complex Barbegal, with 16 overshot wheels driving as many grinding stones. The flour mill made larger scale production possible with less human effort.

It was already known that the Romans were masters in what  we now call water management.

In February 2024, an article was published with beautiful illustrations about new discoveries about the complex at Barbegal, which you can read HERE.

Aqueducts with a gradient of 30 – 40 cm per kilometer,  bathhouses and lead pipes for drinking water. It is claimed that the collapse of the Roman Empire was caused by brain softening of the senators, who suffered lead poisoning.

After the water-powered grain mill was introduced, several techniques were developed over the centuries, both in terms of drive and products to be processed. This is how water mills were developed that we now know as tidal mills, ship mills, overshot and undershot mills. Water-powered mills were developed for all kinds of products, such as the saw mill, paper mill and oil mill; the same drive system for completely different operations.

Oliemolens.nl - Google Maps - Locaties

Our locations – English

Where are our mills located?

On this page you will find an overview per province and location of the locations where our windmills are located and you can easily navigate there.

Select a province

Brabant

Deurne – Holtens Molen

Address
Veldstraat  39
5751AA Deurne
The Netherlands

Website
Holtens Molen

Eindhoven – ‘t Coll

Address
Collseweg 3 – 5
5641JN  Eindhoven (Tongelre)
The Netherlands

Website
Collse Molen

Heeswijk Dinther – De Kilsdonkse Molen

Address
Kilsdonkseweg 4-6
5473KK Heeswijk Dinther
The Netherlands

Website
De Kilsdonkse Molen

Drenthe

Roderwolde – Olie en korenmolen Woldzigt

Address
Hoofdstraat 58
9315PC Roderwolde
The Netherlands

Website
Olie- en korenmolen Woldzigt

Zuidlaren Museum De Wachter

Address
Bolwerk 11
9471AT Zuidlaren
The Netherlands

Address
Museum De Wachter

Friesland

Nes – Alexander Musea

Address
Molenweg 10
9163HP Nes (Ameland)
The Netherlands

Website
Amelander Musea

Gelderland

Arnhem – Rosoliemolen te Ziewert

Address
Hoeferlaan 4
6816SG Arnhem
The Netherlands

Website
Rosoliemolen te Zieuwent

Eerbeek – Eerbeekse oliemolen

Address
Kanaalweg 3
6961LW Eerbeek
The Netherlands

Website
Eerbeekse oliemolen

Arnhem – Rosoliemolen te Ziewert

Adres
Hoeferlaan 4
6816SG Arnhem

Website
Rosoliemolen te Zieuwent

Lievelde – Achterhoeks Openluchtmuseum (Erve Kots)

Address
Eimersweg 4
7137HG Lievelde
The Netherlands

Website
Achterhoeks Openluchtmuseum (Erve Kots)

Oldebroek – Molen De Hoop

Address
Zuiderzeestraatweg 252
8096CJ Oldebroek
The Netherlands

Website
Molen De Hoop

Limburg

Nederweert – Windlust

Address
Roeven 14
6031RN Nederweert
The Netherlands

Website
Molendatabase

Nunhem – Leumolen

Address
Leumolen 3
6083BL Nunhem
The Netherlands

Website
Leumolen

Noord Holland

Koog aan de Zaan – Het Pink

Address
Pinkstraat 12
1541HD Koog aan de Zaan
The Netherlands

Address
Het Pink

Zaandam – De Bonte Hen

Address
Kalverringdijk 39,
1509BT Zaandam
The Netherlands

Website
De Bonte Hen

Zaandam – De Ooievaar

Address
D. Sonoyweg 19
1509BR Zaandam
The Netherlands

Website
De Ooievaar

Zaandam – De Zoeker

Address
Kalverringdijk 31
1509BT Zaandam
The Netherlands

Website
De Zoeker

Overijssel

Ambt Delden – Noordmolen Twickel

Address
Noordmolen 5
7495VK Ambt Delden (Hof van Twente)
The Netherlands

Website
Noordmolen Twickel

Haaksbergen – Oostendorper Watermolen

Address
Watermolenweg 3
7481VL Haaksbergen
The Netherlands

Website
Oostendorper Watermolen

Rijssen – Pelmolen Ter Horst

Address
Pelmolenpad 9A
7461PT Rijssen
The Netherlands

Website
Pelmolen Ter Horst

Zwolle – De Passiebloem

Address
Vondelkade 175
8023AD Zwolle
The Netherlands

Website
Oliemolen De Passiebloem

Oliemolens.nl - Logo - Commissie Olieslaan

Home – English

Pressing oil

Oliemolens.nl - De Kilsdonkse Molen - Heeswijk-Dinther

The craft of oil milling has existed for a long time, the first guild for millers and oil butchers was founded before 1629. At the time, oil mills were industrial mills, in almost 1000 oil mills oil butchers processed 100 to 200 tons of seeds annually. During the season people worked day and night in shifts of sometimes up to 16 hours. Seeds from flax (linseed), rapeseed and hemp were ground and pressed, as well as from beech and walnuts, among others.

From 1850 onwards oil was produced in factories in which steam engines drove hydraulic presses. Thus the craft almost completely disappeared. Thanks to individuals, social organizations and governments, both oil mills, knowledge and skills surrounding the craft have been preserved.

Today, the craft is practiced in the same way as in the past by enthusiastic volunteers. Nowadays there is more attention to safety requirements and hearing protection, in the past oil butchers often became ‘noise deaf’.

Read more

The process

The process of oil milling starts with raw materials such as flax seed, linseed or nuts, and with an oil mill that starts moving. If the mill is powered by wind, the miller turns it on; if it is a water mill, the oil mill does this himself. This sets in motion two large round stones in the mill, the edge stones, which roll over a metal platform. Underneath, the oil butcher finely grinds the chosen raw material until flour remains. This flour is heated on a heated plate to about 50 degrees and mixed around. The heat allows the oil to be released from the flour. The warm flour is then poured into bags that are placed between pressing mats and pressure is applied to these full bags using piles and wedges. This causes oil to emerge and can be collected. The residual product remains in the squeezed bags: the ‘cakes’. These are either dried directly into animal feed, or they are pounded and pressed again into flour. Here too, the end product is a cookie.

Oil striking in a water or windmill is a sustainable craft. The oil and residual products are produced in an almost energy-neutral manner and no waste remains.

The oil can be used as a base for soap and paint. Innovative products resulting from the oil include natuleum, an environmentally friendly carboleum, and hardwood oil.

Some mills produce linseed oil in such a way that it is also suitable for human consumption.

Practitioners and stakeholders

Nowadays there is a group of volunteer oil butchers who strike oil in the 19 operational wind and water mills in the Netherlands. The volunteer oil butchers ensure that the craft is preserved and passed on to a new generation. The public is very welcome when oil is being struck. She can take a tour where a volunteer explains the oil-mining process.

Each oil mill has its own internal training, which is fairly easy to follow. The volunteer oil butchers appreciate the craft, among other things, because it takes place in a monument – a historic mill in motion – and because you go from raw material to product in one afternoon: at the end of a shift there is oil and/or linseed oil cakes/linseed meal.

The nomination was made by committed volunteers from the Olie- en korenmolen Woldzigt, Noordmolen Twickel en Oliemolen Eerbeek.

Visit the oil mills of the Netherlands

There are still 20 oil mills in operation in the Netherlands, sometimes maintained and managed by professional millers, but often by volunteers. For the wind and water mills included in this website, you will find the items of the same name in the menu at the top of the website.

Come and see the mills and be amazed by the often beautiful surroundings, the construction, the technology and the story of the millers and oil butchers about their mill and centuries-old profession.

Addition to the Intangible Heritage Netherlands inventory

On December 5, 2017, there was a party for the Dutch millers. The ancient craft of milling has been recognized by UNESCO as Cultural Intangible Heritage. A recognition for an old craft with a bright future. Please see the UNESCO page in this website for more information.

On December 6, 2023, Olieslaan was added to the Intangible Heritage Inventory of the Netherlands. After this new addition, more than 200 forms of intangible heritage have been added to the Intangible Heritage Inventory of the Netherlands, including crafts, festivals and social practices. Entry into the Inventory is a means to help practitioners keep their intangible heritage alive. By adding it to the Inventory, they show that they are working on safeguarding their intangible heritage and working on its visibility.

Three business corridors

Oil can be extracted from flax, linseed, rapeseed and hemp seed and pressed from beech and walnuts, among other things. This happens in the next three operations.

Oliemolens.nl - Kollergang

The first business run

The first operation is the crushing of the seed, this is done on the collet corridor. The coller stones (edging stones) crush the seed into flour. The ironer sweeps the splashing seed back under the stones. Once the seed has been sufficiently bruised, the miller lowers the runner and opens the slide, through which the flour falls into the flour container.

Oliemolens.nl - Vuister

The second business run

The second operation is heating the seed flour. Heating is done on the fist. This is a firebox made of stone covered with a steel plate. On top of this lies a bottomless pan in which the seed flour is heated to approximately 40 degrees. For production for consumption no hotter than 43 degrees Celsius, for other production up to 80 degrees Celsius. When the seed flour has heated up, the oil butcher slides the pan with the contents over the funnels, after which the seed flour falls into the two suspended bags (buul).

Oliemolens.nl - Slagbank

Below is a sketch explaining how the press bench of an oil mill works.

Oliemolens.nl - Slagbank

The third course of action

The third line of business is oil mining. This oil pressing takes place on the press bench. The bagss are placed here between a pressing board and then placed in the pressing bench. By means of a falling hammer, the hammer is driven downwards and driven into the hammer. This puts pressure on the seed flower. This becomes liquid, causing the oil to be squeezed out of the bags and collected in containers.

Oliemolens.nl - Lijnzaadolie

The final product

The oil always contains dust from the base product. The oil is stored in barrels to settle. This takes several weeks. The oil is then drained above the sediment, resulting in clear oil as shown above. In this case linseed oil.

If oil is preferably stored in a dark place, such as in a cupboard, it can be stored for years without deterioration occurring. Flaxseed oil for consumption can be stored in this way for more than 10 years.